International Space Station Flies Over Earth

I had a dream just like this once:

A time-lapse taken from the front of the International Space Station as it orbits our planet at night. This movie begins over the Pacific Ocean and continues over North and South America before entering daylight near Antarctica. Visible cities, countries and landmarks include (in order) Vancouver Island, Victoria, Vancouver, Seattle, Portland, San Francisco, Los Angeles. Phoenix. Multiple cities in Texas, New Mexico and Mexico. Mexico City, the Gulf of Mexico, the Yucatan Peninsula, El Salvador, Lightning in the Pacific Ocean, Guatemala, Panama, Columbia, Ecuador, Peru, Chile, Lake Titicaca, and the Amazon. Also visible is the earths ionosphere (thin yellow line), a satellite (55sec) and the stars of our galaxy. Raw data was downloaded from;
The Gateway To Astronaut Photography of Earth
http://eol.jsc.nasa.gov/sseop/mrf.htm “.

Super-Invention of the Day: Aerogel

Aerogel:
Despite its incredibly low density, aerogel is one of the most powerful materials on the planet. It can support thousands of times its own weight, block out intense heat, cold and sound – yet it is 1,000 times less dense than glass, nearly as transparent and is composed of %99.8 air. The lowest-density silica-based aerogels are even lighter than air.

Too good to be true? Check it out at Dornob.com

Unofficial Nasa Promo

This is well worth watching:

A Youtube user thinks NASA is “the most fascinating, adventurous, epic institution ever devised by human beings”. We agree. That same guy thinks NASA has no idea how to promote itself. So he made this commercial for them. It’s beautiful.

Titled ‘The Frontier is Everywhere’, this fan-made video perfectly combines an eloquent Carl Sagan voiceover from The Pale Blue Dot with timely splicing of poignant images of Earth and outer space. In the end, going to space is as much about looking at ourselves and the current world around us as it is launching a shuttle.

NASA’s current budget cuts obviously make it a bit difficult to focus heavy resources on public relations and social media, but reconnecting the people with the wonder of space, like this video does, should be more important than it currently is. Via Gizmodo.